SCOTT HOCKING

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  -- Recent Installations and Photography Projects --
  Massa Confusa 2017
  RCA 2016
  Babel 2015-2016
  Celestial Ship of the North (Emergency Ark) 2015
  Signs 2015-present
  Narcissus Incorporated 2015
  Lot Circles 2014-present
  Rustic Sputnik 2016 / Rusty Sputnik 2013
  Coronal Mass Ejection 2013
  The Egg and Michigan Central Train Station 2007-2013
  Mercury Retrograde 2012
  The End of the World 2012
  The Quarry / Steinbruch 2013
  The Secrets of Nature 2012-2014
  Garden of the Gods 2009-2011
  Tartarus 2011
  Triumph of Death 2010
  Sisyphus and the Voice of Space 2010
  New Mound City 2010
  Ziggurat and Fisher Body 21 2007-2009
   
  -- Ongoing Detroit-Based Photo Series' --
  In The Strait Of The Crimson Nain 2007-present
  Detroit Nights 2007-present
  Shipwrecks 1999-present
  Delrazed 2007-present
  Holes 2007-present
  Trees 2007-present
  Memorials 2007-present
  Detroit Wildlife 2007-present
  The Mound Project 2007-present
  Bad Graffiti 2007-present
  The Zone 1999-present
  Cast Concrete in the Auto Age 2008-present
  Mid Century Modern Playground Sculptures 2007-present
   
  -- Other Installations and Photography Projects --
  Roosevelt Warehouse and the Cauldron 2007-2010
  Fountain of Youth Vending Machine 2008-2010
  Lao Zhu and the Flour Factory 2009
  Detroit Midden Mound 2008
  RELICS 2001-2016
  Tire Pyramid 2006
  Animals 2006
  Icelandic Saga 2006
  Scrappers 2000-2004
  Found Slides 2000-2004
  Pictures of a City - Detroit 1997-2006
  Alchemical Works 1997-2006
   
   

  TIRE PYRAMID installation was made entirely from tires illegally dumped throughout Detroit neighborhoods and abandoned sites. 2,109 tires were gathered over the course of one week, installed on a front lawn in the suburb of Bloomfield Hills for two weeks, and finally removed for recycling at the cost of two dollars per tire. Most of the tires were gathered from two Eastside sites - the overgrown acres of the former City Airport Trailercoach Park and the road blocked streets of the I-94 Industrial Park Renaissance Zone. Once dismantled and removed for recycling, the tires were hauled to a recycling plant on the city's Westside, where they were unceremoniously heaped into a giant pile because the 'shredder' was broken. In the many years that I have worked in Detroit, there is no object more commonly dumped than tires.